Beloved and annoying! Salvia madrensis

A look at a plant that’s teaching me new things about Salvia’s. Propagating itself and teasing us with its flowers

Salvia madrensis

Aka: Forsythia sage

Native to the Sierra Madre, Mexico. Grows at 4,000-5,000 elevation in warm, wet areas. First documented by botanist Berthold Carl Seemann (1825 -1871) who worked extensively in South America.

In a tip of my virtual hat to Alison levey’s blog ‘The Blackberry Garden’ where she regularly features a plant that has been causing problems Id like to tell you about mine.

There are a million Salvias I’ve never seen I’m sure. There are nearly a 1000 species recorded and this doesn’t include the variations we have bred from crossing and selection, but when I joined Ulting Wick Philippa introduced me to one completely different to all the others id encountered so far.

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For a start it has yellow, pure yellow flowers! Not orangey yellow, Not red’ish yellow but almost an acid yellow. I only know this as I had to look it up as our single example didn’t get to flowering size in 2017. I was told it was difficult to get cuttings from, this was made even more tricky by the fact that we only had the one and obviously we wanted it to flower too. Always up for a challenge I managed to get three bits of cutting material from a smaller stem and left the main one alone.

Of those 3, 2 struck successfully! I was made up!

This year those 3 made their way into the main beds in the Old Farmyard, where like all the Salvias in the heatwave they sat and did pretty much nothing. They grew! Oh god did they grow! but no flower spikes forming…. until!

The weather eventually returned to near normal, still very much on the dry side but the temperatures became bearable again and suddenly ALL the Salvias decided it might be worth doing some flowering. S. leucantha which has long been a favourite of mine and is a late flowerer at the best of times was almost a month behind where it was last year. ‘Super trooper’ which had flowered prolifically and constantly throughout 2017 had also been sporadic and S. confertiflora was also far behind the previous year

BUT

S. madrensis had flower spikes forming!!

So we waited…. all through September, sporadically checking on progress, getting a stern talking to from Philippa, they progressed slowly. I’m sure glaciers have moved quicker! It was gradually getting there though, by october the colour was starting to show on the spike, still we waited. The weather began to cool, still we waited. The Ensetes and Musa got lifted, still we waited. Eventually today with the prospect of frost on the horizon we gave in and decided to lift them and bring them into a protected place.

Neither of us could bear to cut them down though as we both really wanted to see them flower. So it was agreed they would be lifted entire. As they had flopped a little in situ it kinda looked like they were only around 6 ft tall but as I got in there I had several surprises.

First, they had turned into GIANTS!! The tallest now measures at least 8ft tall.

Second, they had, had babies! Yes babies!

You have no idea of my frustration when I realised exactly how easy propagating from these could be when I had worried and fretted over my 3 measly cuttings from the year before.

Propagating Salvias

There are several different methods you could use depending on genus. The most obvious and commonly used method is stem cuttings. They will all respond well to this. Theres lots of info available on how to do this so I wont cover old ground but I shall say I tend to prefer semi lignate (slightly woody) material and rather than cutting directly below a node as the books will tell you I cut mid-stem. Why? I’m so glad you asked! For a lot of Salvias ,and a few other plants, if you leave them to get old and woody they will start to form adventitious ( aerial ) roots. These roots are always located mid stem, as such it makes sense to think that if they do this happily with no interference from us they will do the same when we take cuttings.

S. madrensis is a bit weird though as it has concave stems, like all members of the sage family they qualify as square, kinda but… well … its easier to show you what I mean

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I will also always try to save 2 growing points above my rooting node for 2 reasons. First if you lose 1 there’s always a second chance and second when the cutting does take and you pot on, pot it slightly deeper each time till that lower growing point is eventually buried and even if disaster strikes there is a chance it could recover!

Some Salvias can be divided, S leucantha is one of these. It layers itself readily and in a very short time can become a bit of a beast. If you want to do this I would recommend leaving it till spring though. Layers can be removed in autumn, cut back and potted up but leave it till spring before putting your spade through the crown of the parent plant.

Very few Salvias however do what madrensis does! I’ve only encountered one in 25 years and even that wasn’t quite the same as what I saw on Friday (Disclaimer, others may well know all about this and it might not be that weird) . My first ever Salvia in 2001 was Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Bloom’. I adored it! That first winter I brought it into my cool glass house and cried because it died… or so I thought!

In spring I turfed the ginormous pot out to the side of the glasshouse thinking I would deal with it later. A month on I glanced down and a 100 fresh green shoots were popping up! Turns out it develops a tuber! I digress

S. madrensis was making a bid for freedom through root runners!

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Back to Friday and I eventually managed to get the monster out of the ground, wrestled its 8ft bulk into the potting shed. Removed the root runners and potted them up. then removed all the big leaves to help it cope with the shocking disturbance id just put it through.

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Normally at this point I would advise cutting them back hard to minimise shock and also utilise the stems for all those cuttings but as we would actually like to see this in full flower before cutting it down.

The  aerial roots are fully formed at the base of the plant which means I can either use them for cuttings when we do cut it back or when we plant out next year we can plant it slightly lower and they will help stabilise the plant and give it a better root system.

Plants never cease to amaze me and sometimes annoy me, you spend months waiting for them to do their thing, weeks trying to propagate from them and then when you turn your back for 5 seconds they do it all on their own!

Hopefully if you have a plant that’s been frustrating you, it will do the same.

Apple pruning courses 2019

Apple pruning courses 2019
Wanting to tackle that tree but don’t know where to start?
Learn a new skill or brush up on old ones?
Treat a loved one to a surprise Xmas gift with a difference!
Heres the details for an exciting day course, get in touch and book a place!

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As some of you will know for the last few years myself and Nick Black have been running Apple pruning courses, these have been growing in popularity and we try to find a new venue every year to challenge people and also to give people the best experience possible.

I think this year we may have surpassed ourselves and its with much delight I can reveal the venue for our upcoming courses is….. (please imagine a drumroll at this point!)….

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Columbine Hall

Columbine dates back to the 14th century, its current owners, Hew and Leslie Stevenson, have spent the last 20 years lovingly restoring the house and grounds. When they first came to Columbine Hall it had been lying empty for 10 years, in 1993 they set to work restoring it and brought in Designer George Carter and employed Head Gardener Kate Elliott.

Kate’s love for the garden shines through and the owners and herself have been amazingly kind to allow us to use their Orchard, which is a perfect age and size, to train a few people on how to prune Apples, Pears, Medlars and Quince.

Kate was kind enough to give us a full guided tour on our visit, which included a peek inside the clockhouse, the west barn, this is hired out for events such as weddings and christenings and the Gig house, which has been converted to a holiday let. The quality of the workmanship is incredible.

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The west barn dates back to the early 1700’s
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A cozy retreat, the Gig house retains character with all the mod cons

Columbines history is fascinating, its previous owners were notorious and illustrious. Ranging from Sir James Tyrell, the supposed murderer of the princes in the tower(1483) to Robert Carey the grandson of the “other Boleyn girl” and rumoured to be the illegitimate grandson of Henry the VIII. Most recently the Hall and its grounds were used as training centre for the Landgirls in WWII and when the moat was dredged recently 100s of Marmite jars dating from that era were found in the spoil! Being a Marmite fan I can thoroughly approve of this but not of the disposal!

Columbine was also one of the few gardens featured in Barbara Segall’s book ‘Secret gardens of east Anglia’ You can find my review of the book here and find out more about Barbara and where to pick up your copy here

The Course

We have 3 dates this year for extra flexibility and ease of attendance

  • 16th February 2019 – Saturday
  • 24th February 2019 – Sunday
  • 2nd March 2019 – Saturday

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The day will run from 10Am to 4PM and will include hot drinks, Soup, bread and some sugary treats such as cake to keep your strength up!

Your Instructors

Nick is a fully trained arborist & whilst we don’t expect you to be climbing huge trees his knowledge of both how trees work & horticulture is invaluable. Nick can be found normally working as The Muddy Gardener. You can also find him being cheeky on twitter @imnickblack

As for me, I have nearly 20 years of looking after fruit trees under my belt, trained at Pershore college under John Edgerly, then at Ryton Organic gardens, I moved onto become the Veg gardener at Sissinghurst where we established a large Orchard under Amy Wardman who had been the Fruit student at RHS Wisley and was very generous at passing on her knowledge.
It was there that I first started training people to prune fruit & it gives me great joy to help people become confident and proficient.

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The day will start at 10am where you will all gather and we can discuss where your skill level is as we are happy to take on absolute beginners through to those that have experience & want to progress.
You will be shown all the tools you will need and have their safe use & maintenance explained to you. Then we will go through pruning maiden trees to establish the correct framework for freestanding, espalier, fan & other styles of fruit trees.
After a short break, to warm up & refuel on hot tea & cake, we will start to tackle the big trees! This will give us an excellent opportunity to discuss different methods of pruning & the reasons for it. If you have a tree which has got out of hand this will be exactly what you need!
A break for a warming lunch of soup and then..
Once the demonstration is over you will be let loose on your own trees with both of us at your beck & call for advice if you get stuck!
Finally, we will gather to discuss any questions & do a quick session on apple tree pest, diseases & disorders.

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The Cost
The day will cost £70.00 per person but will include Drinks, soup & snacks
Also £20 will go straight to Marie curie via my Just giving page
If you’d like to sign up just fill in the form below and I will send you further details or if you wish to buy it as an xmas present for a loved one and keep it as a surprise we can arrange that too, look forward to hearing from you

 

A year in the life of a Sweet pea grower – Johnsons Sweet Peas

A year in the life of a Sweet pea grower – Johnsons Sweet Peas
Ever wondered where your seeds come from? I did!
I was lucky enough to see how Phil Johnson a UK grower from Kent produces his so you can have beautiful Sweet Peas.

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Have you ever wondered exactly how seed companies get all the seeds they sell you? How they keep varieties true to type? How they breed new varieties?

I have and last January I decided to go and find out with the help of a British seed firm specialising in Sweet Peas.

Phil Johnson very kindly offered to let me see the process from start to finish! Growing and selling Sweet Pea seeds and seedlings for 10 years now, he started small with his business based in Kent. Gradually building a reputation for quality and consistency his business has gone from strength to strength.

Johnsons Sweet Peas is now one of very few independent seed suppliers in the UK and maybe the only one specialising in just Sweet Peas. In a competitive market where the big boys rule how exactly has he managed to be successful?

Phil is incredibly mild mannered, quiet and affable as a person, not someone you think of in the sense of a cut and thrust business world but maybe therein lies his success, he’s very likable and knows his subject inside out. He has been a member of the Sweet pea society from a very young age and used to give talks and lectures on them to Horticultural societies for many years, sadly time constraints have now put paid to this.  He is also a member of the RHS Herbaceous trials committee, this, the growing business and family life now take priority over talks! He has a passion for Sweet Peas. He has 2 part time workers which help sow the sweet peas that he sells at various fairs around the south east in the spring but for the most part he quietly beavers away, sowing, planting, harvesting, packaging and selling his varieties by himself!

Starting now his small team will be sowing pots for sale in spring and by March/April they will have around 15,000 Sweet peas ready for planting out in people’s gardens. They grow somewhere between 160 to 170 different varieties every year which means they can provide not only baby sweet peas but also an excellent range of fresh seed for those varieties that are a little bit more difficult to get hold of …. but how!

I popped along to his facilities on a gloomy February evening to see how he starts his year.

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Phil shows me some of the sweet peas grown for sale to the public
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Some of the varieties to be grown out for seed saving

In the massive glasshouses he had more sweet peas growing than you can imagine and certainly more than I was able to picture, sweet peas don’t need vast amounts of heat to germinate and once they have germinated they are quickly potted on and moved to the cool growing on section. The temperature in here is only just above the ambient, making it quite a chilly environment to be standing around in.

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In the process of pricking out for sales

We quickly retreated to the office where I was shown the vast quantities of seed needed to supply demand, Id never even considered, never mind seen what this would entail and the thought of achieving all this with such a small team is daunting to say the least but Phil is totally unphased by it all. The seed is stored in huge bags in a climate controlled area, cool, dry and stacked to the ceiling!

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Seed stored ready to be packaged and sent out
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How many!!

Phil tells me there is approx. 12 seeds to a gram and in a year tons of seeds can go through this facility. I’ve always imagined that this would take a massive team of people not just 3!

He mentions that later in the year I might like to come back and see how they grow varieties out, obviously I am delighted to accept, and explains they do this for several reasons. Firstly to check that varieties are ‘True to type’. this means that the genetics are stable, sometimes a variety will break down over time, losing virility. That there is no cross pollination happening somewhere in the supply chain which would muddy the variety, although rare as Sweet Peas are self fertile this will sometimes occur. Lastly, and this is the part that is massively exciting! To trial newly bred Sweet Peas which will be coming up for sale in the future.

And so on a boiling hot day in June I got the call id been very excitedly waiting for!

I literally can’t describe how amazing the smell was as I pulled up and stepped out of my car, the scent of a million sweet peas escaping from the doors of 2 aircraft hangar sized glasshouses is incomparable to anything else I’ve ever experienced. Row upon row, in full flower, each vying for my attention, amazing!

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Phil was waiting for me with a ‘map’ of what was growing where. Some of the names very familiar old favourites, others having just a set of numbers and letters to identify them. These were incredibly exciting as they are so newly bred they haven’t even been named! I get ahead of myself though and I was about to be given a masterclass in Sweet pea growing….

There are currently on the market 2 main types of Sweet pea

Heirloom/Old fashioned

  • Clamped keel
  • Stronger scent

A well known variety of this type is Cupani

Spencer

  • Open keel
  • Bigger flowers
  • Longer stems
  • More colour varieties
  • Less scent

The next part to consider are the descriptions of flower colour

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Now of course there are single colours…

The edge…

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The flakes…

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And the bicolours…

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Now if you can get your head round these prepare to have it blown off! Did you know about shifters? I didn’t!

These are the ones that can change colour almost completely from when they first open in the most delightful way. If you’re going for a particular colour scheme I guess they could be a bit of a nightmare but if youre more liberal in your colour combinations these can be incredible fun!

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And although I can’t say too much about the new breeds which Phil has in the pipelines I can say they’re a game changer when it comes to sweet pea colours and retain the scent which we all adore!

How do you go about breeding a new sweet pea though?

Like most members of the pea family they self pollinate, this means its relatively easy to get them to come true from seed but it does mean that in order to produce new ones human intervention is needed in most cases.

Phil shows me how he opens the keel, pictured below…

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to expose the stamens and pistil of the flower. The stamen, made up of the filaments and anther, are the male parts of the flower. The Pistil is the female part. The stamens must be carefully removed before the flower has fully opened, to stop self pollination occurring and pollen from a different flower applied to the pistil. Once pollinated it needs to be protected from further cross-pollination. If you can get hold of a tiny mesh gift bag they are perfect for the job allowing air to circulate but preventing insects from helping.

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I spent well over an hour with Phil asking lots of questions, getting very excited over some of his new breeds and getting my very own sweet pea selfie with Frances Kate, a Spencer type particularly good for competition growing due to its long straight stems

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Phil also showed me how to straighten a slightly bent stem between thumb and forefinger.

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One main thing when planting your sweet peas out is not to overcrowd them, less is more! Overplanting will cause them to flower less as they will try hard to produce green growth to the detriment of flower production. No more than 2 per station and 6 inches apart. For bushy growth pinch them out often, for a show growers cordon pinch out sideshoots and tendrils. Deadhead regularly, at the very least every other day. As soon as a plant has managed to produce seed it will quit flowering.

Phil gave me permission to pick a posy of Sweet peas before I left, I was like a kid in a sweet shop! Beautiful!

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The sharpest eyed of you may spot one or two VERY unusual varieties in the bunch!

How does his year end?

Come September you’ll find Phil in a far more mechanised environment!

After the dry husks have been harvested they get put through some very noisy, dusty processes in order to bring you the finished product. Once again I went to see how this happens…

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Massive bags of dried pods are lined up ready for processing, then he showed me the machines that help to do it…

Firstly the pods are broken up and good seeds are thrown one way, small unviable seeds and husks the other…

Then a second process refines it…

 

 

 

And finally the precious seeds are clean and ready to be packaged! It makes you realise exactly how much work goes into that lovely little packet of seeds you’re about to sow!

I will never again pull a face at how much I pay for seeds, not that I really did anyway, but it’s really opened my eyes to see the whole year through.

So go and have a peruse of his lovely website and see for yourself how many truly wonderful varieties he has on offer, now’s the time to get sowing!

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Potty about #Glee18

A quick look at what’s new at #glee18 the horticultural & gardening trade show
Pots and tools that caught my eye. @woodlodge_uk & @BurgonandBall stood out from the crowd

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It was that time of year again when a myriad of the Horticultural trades trek up, or down depending on your perspective, to Birmingham. GLEE is the trade show behind the horticultural industry attracting all the big names, suppliers of tools, products, sundries, you name it they are there. It’s a chance for the likes of myself to see what’s new, meet people who are incredibly knowledgeable in their chosen areas, listen to seminars and catch up with friends.

This year I only went for the one day, I would’ve loved to have stayed longer but real life is just way too busy at the moment. This did of course mean I had to stay focussed … and I almost managed it!

I found myself very drawn to look at stands featuring glossy pots, perhaps im nesting? I kept imagining how wonderful my life would be if I could finally achieve that minimalist look ive always dreamed of and failed to achieve as im a horrendous hoarder of clutter. I have real issues with throwing anything away. Seriously its painful! It drives me insane that I can’t let a set of candlesticks go just because they belonged to my gran. They match nothing, add nothing to my life but they thought of giving them to the charity shop fills me with horror. I may well have found a cure though!

If I can declutter I feel I can reward myself with a few nice, well chosen beautiful things now I have a lovely house to go with them!

The first to catch my eye and please forgive me that this is a ‘trend’ at the moment was a stand featuring all manner of houseplants. Houseplants have seen an almost ,meteoric rise in popularity. Driven partly by a need to have green things in a life which feels increasingly removed from nature. Writers such as Jane Perrone have helped bring this to the forefront of people’s minds and her ‘Off the ledge’ Podcast

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I fell totally in love with these glossy jars, a modern take on the 70’s terrariums I saw as a kid. I’m pretty sure we had one, at least until I was 3, I can’t remember it after moving though. Im sure it never held a bromeliad, in fact I think the only thing in it was probably a spider plant.

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Javado are trade suppliers only, these are the guys that sell in bulk to your local garden centres and probably a million other outlets so although you can’t buy direct from them looking at their stand gives you a good idea how strong the houseplant and sundries market has become over the last few years. catering to the super chic tastes right through to a beautiful bit of kitsch madness!

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Going potty for pots? Another trade supplier which had some fabulous examples is Scheurich

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They were good enough to take me on a tour of their stand and show me their new range of retro plant pots. Their colourful industrial style make them the perfect home for tiny cacti and succulents.

The full range look delightful together!

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What I did find really interesting about GLEE this year was how many manufacturers where showing off their environmentally friendly, recycling credentials! Speaking to a rep from Strata, the manufacturers of Sanky and Ward brands, she was quick to explain that literally everything they produce is recyclable and the factory produces no waste products themselves as it all goes back to the start of the manufacturing process!

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Woodlodge also are at the forefront of recycling with their new range of Eco-Terra plastic pots. Made with the look of permanence and a modern style these pots can be easily recycled. The woodlodge stand is a pot lovers dream though! If you’re looking to pimp your patio their range comes in all shapes and styles including a very funky display in primary colours!

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But personally I fell in love with the William Morris range

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But what of tools?

Burgon & Ball are always leaders in quality products, and this year was no different! As a maker of shears they have always been ahead of the game being in the business since 1730!! They really have dominated the market in high quality gardening tools for at least 50 years and now their range of gardening sundries is beyond compare. Well designed, stylish, dependable and endorsed by the RHS, what more could you want!

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If you’re looking for gifts for the gardener in your life, look no further!

Gardeners are an inventive lot and will use whats to hand, this can often be frustrating when forks, knives, screwdrivers and other tools go missing and end up in the potting shed being used as dibbers or for pricking out seedlings. So get yourself a happy gardener by giving them tools custom made for these jobs!

we’d never buy these for ourselves as we’re saving our pennies for seeds and plants, obviously! But Burgon & Ball have created a range perfect for stocking fillers, birthday prezzies or just an everyday gift to stop your cutlery from migrating to the potting bench…

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and so my flying visit to GLEE was over for another year, cant wait till 2019! Hope you’ve found this useful!

 

 

 

STIHL FSA 130 brushcutter and AR 1000 backpack battery – Review

STIHL FSA 130 brushcutter and AR 1000 backpack battery – Review
Considering going battery? the cordless range from STIHL is worth looking at
Tools of quality from a trusted name

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Disclaimer!

The guys at STIHL have very kindly given me this kit to trial and review. I have received no payment from them.

There, now we’ve got that out of the way I can tell you all about it!

A while back, at GLEE, the lovely people at STIHL told me their battery powered kit was equal to any petrol driven kit on the market, including their own!

That’s quite a claim to make! So I went up to RHS Hyde Hall to see their Chainsaws in action, after all if you’re looking to challenge battery vs petrol a chainsaw would be one of the toughest challenges, right?

So on a chilly November day I turned up to see some of the STIHL products on demo… and see Matthew’s giant pumpkins obvs!dsc_0391

After watching an expert Chainsaw artist at work carving an owl, which really was a truly stunning display of skill – don’t try this at home folks! I got to see the battery powered option in action, ridiculously quiet in comparison.

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Dave
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A battery chainsaw making short work of this log

The guys on the STIHL display stand were really happy to chat to me and take me through the pros and cons of battery vs petrol and reassured me that their battery options have come on in leaps and bounds since id last tried one out including various battery sizes to suit different needs.

I was asked if id like to try out one of their chainsaws but as im not licensed to use one I politely declined and instead went for something which doesn’t get as much visibility as it deserves, a brushcutter!

Most of us know about strimmers and they’re a handy bit of kit for gentle tasks around the garden but if you want something with a bit more ‘WOOF!’ what you need is a brush cutter.

How do they differ?

A strimmer has a nylon cord which feeds through the head and effectively whips things to death by revolving incredibly fast. The downside of this is when you come up against things that have a bit more structure to them, say for example a reedbed, a meadow or even small tree saplings. The strimmer cord wears away very quickly and you find yourself replacing it on a regular basis.

A brushcutter has a metal blade, this allows you to tackle pretty much all the same jobs as with a strimmer head, with small exceptions which ill come back to, and then go on to tackle some of the bigger jobs which a strimmer just isn’t built for.

I figured that if I was really going to test battery vs petrol it needed to be on the kind of work that would really challenge it. Something you normally associate brute strength given by petrol engines on. So they suggested I try out the FSA 130 with the backpack battery AR 1000

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So I started it off on ‘Twist’, this is our annual wildflower meadow bit around the sculpture of that name. After flowering we would normally strim this down so the seeds get a chance to be dispersed but a strimmer isn’t great at scarifying which gives the seeds a chance to get themselves in a position to germinate, a brushcutter can do that. obviously you’re not looking to strip the ground, just cut into the top vegetation sufficiently to allow the seeds to get down to the soil.

At this point I had no clue how long the battery would last or how quickly I could get through the job. The backpack battery has a handy little readout on the back which when you press a button it will light up a series of indicator lights to give you an idea of how much charge it has. This obviously isn’t an indicator of time as there are many variables which come into play regarding how long your charge will last. You can also buy different battery sizes to fit your own needs which will fit the entire range of STIHL cordless products. So if we decided to get the cordless hedge trimmers in the future this battery pack comes with an adaptor to fit them and the backpack has the advantage of holding a larger charge and distributing the weight for the user better than a petrol model.

The backpack model I was using weighs just 5.5KG in total which genuinely is barely noticeable in use. I’m not a big person, I weigh 53KG wet through and stand at just 5ft3 so you really don’t have to be Jeff Capes to use this kit. On that note if I have one criticism of the backpack it would only be that its made for someone taller than me. As you can see from the pic getting it to sit right is a bit of a challenge for someone with a short body and a more curvy frame, shall we say, than your average bloke

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It sits higher on my back than I suspect it is designed to do and it has an unfortunate placing on the chest webbing which I can deal with but I suspect if I was more buxom would become a serious problem. This is often a problem when it comes to power tools, and tractors for that matter, as traditionally it has been great big strapping blokes using them and its taking manufactures a while to catch up and take into account that some of us are more slightly built. I am lucky as I find ways round this but it might be something in the future which might be worth considering given that about 50% of the workforce in horticulture is female. Perhaps an option of harnesses could be given?

That said, this is a small criticism, and not one I would reject it over.

It took around half an hour to cut down this area and the brush cutter makes far less of a mess than a strimmer to clean up.

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When I checked to see how much battery life I had left I was pleasantly surprised to find I’d barely dented the charge so I thought id give it a bit more of a challenge!

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Around the edge of our pond we have lots of annoying reeds which have gradually moved further and further out into the grass, obscuring the edge and potential hazards, like tree stumps, when mowing. You can strim these but you go through cord like no tomorrow and it just doesn’t do as good a job. In order to weaken the reeds and re-establish the mowing line cutting them down is the most effective method. Yes I could spray them off but its less than 3M from a watercourse. I couldn’t use a broadleaf weedkiller as it wouldn’t affect reeds so my options on which chemicals I could use are severely limited and we just don’t have the time to physically dig them out.

The brush cutter made short work of these annoying invaders, allowing us to take the ‘edge’ of the grass right back to the more ornamental grass which lurks nicely on the waterline.

We ended up clearing about 6 trailer loads of debris away!

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We can now decide how much of these guys to allow to creep back in for wildlife and aesthetics and keep them looking tidy.

Even at the end of this I still hadn’t managed to completely drain the battery despite running on full power for most of the time.

The FSA 130 has interchangeable heads available for different jobs, as I’ve said we chose the brushcutter attachment, a general all purpose blade, but you can fit a strimmer head. A choice of metal blades for different purposes and a circular saw blade!

This obviously makes it a very versatile piece of kit but it should also be treated with respect. There is always a danger of kickback and flying objects. When you’re using it it’s always advisable to walk the area first to ensure any hazards are noted and small animals such as hedgehogs or snakes have been ushered into a safer place. Also ‘don’t do as I do’ advice. Spot my deliberate mistake in the pics? As the weather was so hot I stupidly decided to wear shorts, something I wouldn’t normally do at work for H&S reasons… I got an excellent reminder why this shouldn’t be done! Not only did I get hit by bits of debris (which isn’t so bad till you hit a slug or something gross) but just as seriously I got bitten by a tic which I didn’t know anything about till a week or so later. On this occasion I think I’ve been lucky but it’s really not worth taking any chances over!

Overall I can say I’m honestly pleasantly surprised by its performance and I’m now looking for more areas we can used the FSA 130 in! I’ve gone brushcutter happy!

If you have any questions on it and want a brutally honest answer I’ll be happy to answer them from an end users point of view, if you’re looking for a more technical reply I’d advise talking to the lovely people at STIHL

Overall how happy with it?

It’s quiet, lightweight, powerful, holds charge for ages!

I’m bloody delighted with it and I’d recommend to anyone!

 

Ulting wick, a year in..

Ulting wick, a year in..
I’ve been at Ulting Wick just over a year now and I’m such a happy bunny! A quick update on whats happening here, Dahlias, roses, exotics and more

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Its about time I gave you an update on whats been happening at the beautiful Ulting Wick. I’ve passed my years anniversary, its just flown by! Seriously, I haven’t felt so happy in my work like this in such a long time. Each day doesn’t seem long enough and Philippa is often urging me to go home but I love it here so much I just cant tear myself away. Its SO good to feel this way again about my job, good company and beautiful surroundings. I sing and laugh my way through pretty much every day.

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The last time I updated you it was fast approaching Tulip time, right? I’m delighted to say they performed beautifully and the weather behaved, mostly, for the openings and you guys made it an excellent couple of days. I adore seeing peoples reactions to the garden, it makes all those freezing cold, wet winter days worthwhile.

The tulips now seem a distant memory, even if it was only April, since they went over most have been lifted in preparation for planting out the old farmyard, beds have been mulched and composted, weeded and spritzed. The veg garden is now in full swing, sweetpeas have flowered their heads off!

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Most exciting, I started to clip the box, although since the intense sun kicked in I’ve taken a break, and planting out has been completed on the old farmyard. Now its a race against time and weather (for me) to get it clipped before the jungle sweeps over it and clipping becomes difficult. It going a lot quicker so far though and at a rough estimate each parterre will be the equivalent of 26,000 ‘steps’. That’s 104,000 times I’ll have gone ‘snip, snip, snip’ in total.

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Of course we are all talking about this freakishly hot, dry weather. I was warned about the fact it was dry here but for 6 straight weeks we’ve had pretty much no rain… unless you count the MM we had the other day. Compare that to last year or the average and its ridiculous!raindetail

In fact its so dry the grass is now crunchy and brown!

Spoiler alert, I know some people don’t like snakes so fair warning, at the VERY END of this post I will show you our giant grass snake BUT I will warn you again before doing so.

Fortunately the roses have been loving this weather!

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In the old farmyard planting the exotics out has been completed and its just starting to knit together beautifully, the paulownia is already about 6 or 7 ft high! and of course the Dahlias are doing their thing beautifully!

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But its not just Dahlias that have been shining brightly as stars of the garden, once mote Nicotiana glauca is performing beautifully!

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And the Canna australis are literally glowing, glowing I tell thee!

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Various other beauties around the garden have captured my heart in the last 6 weeks or so, this Argyrocytisus battandieri below, sometimes called Morrocan broom, has put on a wonderful show.

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The Duetzia, which is easily mistaken for a Philadelphus.

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Lilium martagon, which I genuinely don’t remember last year, have been gorgeous popping up through the ferns.

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Digitalis ‘Pams split’ has been insane!! topping out at 7 or 8ft they have unfortunately swamped out everything nearby but they have been truly magnificent.

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Finally on the flower front but by no means least! Lysmachia atropurpurea ‘Beaujolais’, silvery glaucous leaves with deep magenta/crimson spires of flowers that are just divine.

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Something a bit different for me, an understated foliage plant, Osmunda regalis the royal fern and very regal it is too. reaching to around 4 – 5 ft high gentle, soft green foliage acts as a wonderful backdrop to weird reptilian fronds which are the ones that produce the spores. Ferns were around long before plants and this guy has a distinctly Jurassic look to him, love him!

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I’m really hoping these drought conditions wont have a detrimental effect for our August bank holiday opening though! As were all working very hard to make it special. I’m hoping my pumpkin arch will be hitting people on the heads with a veritable rain of fruit and that we might even get a shower or two to make our crunchy, brown grass green and soft once more!

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Talking of which…

SNAKE ALERT!

Now if you’re not a lover of our snakey friends I shall warn you scroll no further as this bad boy is MAGNIFICENT!!

A quick gestimation puts him, or more likely her, at about half a metre long and it is seriously the biggest grass snake I have ever had the pleasure of seeing, I literally squealed with delight and ran across to get a shot. Understandably the snake wasn’t so keen to meet me and streaked across the grass for cover but what a magical moment it was!

Ladies and gentlemen I give you….

Grassy Mcsnakeface!

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Floral fantasia at RHS Hyde Hall

Floral fantasia at RHS Hyde Hall with Thompson and Morgan
Set in the old vegetable garden T&M have created a wonderfully colourful display of some of their bedding plants available from seed and plug plants
Heres just a few of them on show!

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Imagine an entire garden just dedicated to bedding plants, a riot of colour and scent! Literally every way you turn there is an extravaganza of shapes and forms, they tumble from towers, explode from baskets, scramble up spires, drip from containers and carpet the beds.

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Well imagine no more! You can see this vision for real at RHS Hyde Hall from the 4th June to 30th September. Thompson & Morgan have created a breathtaking display using every available bedding plant you can think of and some you’ve possibly never heard of.

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Its rare these days to see displays of this magnitude. Growing up I remember public spaces, such as parks, would often have such bedding schemes that were incredibly complicated. The skill, the time and the effort that would be put into designing and growing the plants for this are phenomenal. Sadly for this reason most public spaces are given over to low maintenance programmes now and if I’m honest I miss this. Yes, it can be garish and overstated. Yes, they are loud, cheerful and brightly coloured… but honestly, is that really so bad?

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No, its not chic, its not thought of in polite gardening circles as stylish or understated. For me that is the joy of it though. Its fairgrounds and seaside, its sheer vivacity is uplifting! Its joyful, it shouts, its summer and ice creams and maybe its time we had more of this in our life?

Ok, maybe you don’t have to fill your garden with every colour or variety imaginable, you could just choose one or two of these gems to bedazzle your friends and neighbours. Often less is more but there is a return in interest to some of the more old fashioned flowers in the gardens around the country. Take the meteoric rise in Dahlias popularity in the last few years.

I’d like to share Some of the plants that caught my eye as I wandered round and hopefully you will see something that inspires you but Id really recommend visiting yourself as this is just a fraction of whats there.

Osteospermum ‘Blue eyed beauty’

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I adore Osteospermums, they just keep going! They don’t mind drought conditions which means less watering, and come in almost every colour. My very first was a variety called ‘Whirligig’ which had an odd mutant petal shape. This one has the most glorious colour combination of a butter yellow and a deep amethyst centre with just a hint of orange on the anthers, very Christopher Lloyd!

Osteospermum ‘Berry white’

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This Osteospermum is so new on the market its still protected by trademark! Part of a new range of double Osteospermums which cope well in low light conditions and unlike its single flowered relations the flowers stay open at nightfall. Its petals have a gentle magenta flush and the centre is a deep raspberry.

Calceolaria ‘calynopsis series- Orange’

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For sheer oddness and prolific flowering the award has to go to the recently introduced Calynopsis series. As a child I chose a Calceolaria as ‘my plant’ and I still remember it fondly. It lasted, despite my irregular ministrations and possible abuse for what seemed like forever. My mum called it a ‘poor mans orchid’ but they go by many common names, most often slipper or pouch flower. She would carefully deadhead it on my behalf and I suspect its success was down to her care more than mine. Seeing this plant brought back many happy memories. I’ve always thought they look a bit like cheerful muppet faces but regardless of all these associations there’s no denying their impact!

Grown from seed they are a biennial but the Calynopsis series are currently only available as plug plants.

Celosia argentea ‘Kelos Fire Purple’

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Another great new introduction, this member of the Amaranth family would normally be very dependent on day length to trigger flowering but extensive breeding has made this particular variety day length neutral, reaching up to 14 inches tall they make a real statement either in pots or in the border. Attractive foliage with feather like plumes held erect in great numbers, whats not to love!

Ageratum ‘High tide’

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Ageratum is one of the first bedding plants I sowed and grew for myself, at the time it wasn’t often seen, the heyday of its popularity had been as a summer carpet bedding plant. Breeding has given us a taller more floriferous plant which can in fact be used as a cut flower! Much taller than its predecessor it holds up well as a border plant rather than just a bedder.

Thompson and Morgan are also putting a lot of time and effort into breeding new plants and I felt very honoured to be shown some of their new introductions both in bedding plants and vegetables!

Alstromerias have seen a massive rise in popularity and not only have they bred an extra tall variety which can hold up to the British winter but they’ve also got a new one they’ll be releasing for sale which can grow and flower to 3ft from seed in one season!

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Also Begonia fragrant falls series

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And last but by no means least! ‘Sunbelievable’ a sunflower with good sized heads that can produce over a 1000 blooms over a summer!! And the bees absolutely love it!

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So if youre looking for this summers ‘must haves’ in bedding plants head over to RHS Hyde Hall for your inspiration!

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#RHSHamptonCourt – the ‘must have’ plants!

#RHSHamptonCourt is over for another year but what did you bring home with you? Heres some of my flower choices from this years show

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All the beautiful gardens at Hampton Court will have disappeared now, the only evidence they were ever there will be some  slightly yellow but soggy grass, some trampled areas from the thousands of feet that have passed by and some slightly perturbed bees looking for the flowers that they were sure were there yesterday!

If you didn’t get a chance to visit heres a look at which plants caught my eye both in the gardens and the floral marquee

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Firstly out in the gardens, there are always a few plants it seems that every designer includes. Last year it was a very popular dark purple, almost black Agapanthus and Achillea cassis in various scarlets and pink forms. This year it seems the must have plants for Hampton were …

calycanthus x raulstonii ‘Hartlage wine’

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Aka: Carolina allspice or sweetshrub

Named after the student who created the cross, Richard Hartlage. The plants parents are Sinocalycanthus chinensis (Chinese species) with Calycanthus floridus (U.S. species) in 1991 at the JC Raulston Arboretum at North Carolina State University.

It prefers growing in a slightly shady position to get the best performance from it. Lightly prune for shape directly after flowering.

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I think I saw this on about 5 gardens around the showground and on at least 1 display in the marquee and I’m now in love with it!

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Senecio candicans ‘Angel Wings’

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I saw this a few times last year but this year it was in literally EVERY garden! Understandable, its a striking plant. A relatively new introduction with the aid of micro-propping supplies have been bulked up to epic proportions. Its drought tolerant, handy given this years weather, and really doesn’t care what type of soil you have so long as its not sitting in a bog garden.

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Its beautiful silver, felted leaves are its real selling point and also give you the clue it prefers full sun.

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I always spend ages in here as this is the place you’ll see the new, the old favourites and sometimes some stunning rarities

Dibleys always have an excellent display of Streptocarpus and as houseplants go you really cant fault them. They don’t mind indirect light, in fact they prefer a slightly darker corner. If given a feed they will flower almost continuously. Easy to propagate either through division or for the more adventurous spirit through leaf cuttings!

Going through old pics of their display from previous years I see I have photographed this particular variety multiple times so its obviously one im drawn to and at present I only have 1 Strep in my collection I might have to remedy that… although it does have to be said my dad has far more success with them than I do, I think I neglect them a bit too much!

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Going with the tender plant theme another house plant I love beyond words (but have little success with if im honest, I think I love them too much) are the Zantendeschias from Brighter Blooms.

There are 2 main types of Zantendeschia, the taller, hardy types with predominantly white flowers and the tender, shorter varieties with coloured blooms like these below. All will form a rhizome and I think this is where ive mistakenly given up on mine in the past as they have gone dormant and ive thought ive killed them, its also possible ive overwatered them and the rhizome rotted off. Now I know a bit more about them im inclined to try again!

They are happiest at an optimum temp of  25 °C, with growth being suppressed once daily average temperatures persist at 28 °C.

This chap, Zantendeschia ‘Memories’ with the almost black spathe and purple tinted leaf caught my eye, I think it has rehmannii parentage but happy to be corrected by others that know better.

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and this one with a gentler pastel tinted tone Zantendeschia ‘Picasso’

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My last selection on the tender side is this absolute beauty of a monster! This was part of the actual display so would take a while to grow to this size but its not unachievable for those of you who have a conservatory to overwinter it in, or you could just keep several small versions on the go by propagating from it on a regular basis.

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Echiveria ‘Red sea monster’ certainly lives up to its name, looking distinctly Kraken like rearing out of its pot with red edged, wavy, margined succulent leaves and at such a size!! What a stunner!

In fact the whole display of cacti and succulents from Southfield Nursery was a bit special, some of the slower growing varieties being older than me.

Moving onto the hardier plants for your garden I do find myself looking not just for colour but also for scent, a rule of thumb with most scented plants is their flowers will be less showy but there are always exceptions to this rule! These 2 dainty offerings are not overstated on size, in fact elegant is how I would describe them but the scent was heavenly! In our droughty summer they would also perform with very little intervention needed.

Calmazag Nursery had a stunning display of Dianthus but the scent from these two was sublime! D. ‘silver star’ had a slightly larger semi double flower with a raspberry eye, whilst D. ‘Stargazer had a wonderful open flower with a deep purple almost black eye.

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Perhaps Leucanthemums are seen as an old fashioned flower? If they are I don’t care. They are reliable, trouble free and just carry on flowering forever! They always remind me of my mum too which is nice, she used them a lot in flower arranging. Recently I’ve been seeing some doubles and semi doubles for sale which adds a whole new dimension to them. This one, Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Christine Hagemamm’ I spotted on the Hardy’s plants stall. I just love its frilly, frothy centre!

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Hardy’s has always been a great source of inspiration for me *Fan girl Klaxon!* ever since I got into gardening it was always their stall I lingered at longest and asked the most questions at… and often spent the most money at! Both Rosy and Rob have always been exceptionally gracious with their time and patient of me being annoying as have all their staff. I’ve always found something that  draws me so its little wonder that the next few plants I spotted on my list are featured on their display.

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Campanula ‘Pink octopus’ is an adorable bonkers little plant, not a new introduction but its one ive liked for a few years now. Unlike most campanulas where the petals are fused into a bell shape these are held separately and flare outwards in a pastel shade of raspberry pink, great for ground cover in a shady area.

This next one is just insanity though!

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Plantago major ‘Rosularis’ on talking to Rob I discovered this is not a new plant rather just one I’ve never seen! How I’ve missed this I’m not sure but hey, always learning! Its of the same family as the common plantain, which is often considered a weed due to its abundantly fertile habit. This is also the reason the plantagenet family chose it as their symbol. As a general rule I’m not keen on green flowers, they feel a bit pointless to me but I may change my mind after seeing this ruffled spire of loveliness!

Next up are the Salvias and if you want to see them in all their glory the Dyson’s nursery stand is where to head for. William has brought out a couple of new varieties this year despite having an awful winter by all accounts!

‘So cool pale blue’ and ‘So cool purple’ are lovely little short shrubby salvia varieties, excellent for pots and front of the border.

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Now as much as I love Salvias I admit I’m finding it really hard to like this one, over the last few years we’ve seen a number of new Salvias launched ‘Love and wishes’, ‘Embers wish’ and ‘Wendys wish’ being just 3 in the series. This year sees the launch of S. ‘Wishes and kisses’ and for me it falls very short of the mark (sorry). Maybe because the last few releases have been SO special I’m now spoilt? Its flower colour is insipid, none of the vibrancy I expect from a salvia and the calyx colour jars badly with the flower. I’m sure someone out there will love it, many in fact, but I’m not a fan.

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However!

And this is not a new release but an easy to grow bedder S. splendens ‘Go-Go purple’ is a real showstopper in my book! Big flowers, rich colouring, held high above vibrant green foliage, what’s not to love!

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A nutty little Allium for you all now, I saw this being used a few times around the place and also at GLEE last year.

Allium ‘Forelock’ has the most unusual appearance, a tight ball of maroon flowers tipped white which gives a frosted look to the flower head, with a Mohican style effect sprouting from the top!

Reaching half a metre tall these guys are sure to add interest to your borders!

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Last but by no means least!

If you’re looking for something both weird and wonderful look no further than Plantbase UK. Specialising in that something a bit out of the ordinary Graeme’s nursery is a treasure trove of the unusual.

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This fabulous single leaf belongs to Sauromatum venosum, a voodoo Lilly which produces an amazing, if somewhat pungent flower every other year.  If you have a shady spot that needs a wow factor this is just perfect for you!

Tell me what caught your eye this year!

Hampton Court 2018

Hampton Court 2018
Theres so much to see and do at this years Hampton I was plum tuckered by the end of the day
A first view of the gardens and a to do list!
I’ll be adding plant profiles later this week!
#RHSHamptonCourt

 

Hampton Court has always been a favourite of mine, ever since my first view, driving a lorry laden with plants across a dusty, sun bleached field with a herd of deer in the distance. That first experience of an RHS Show was in retrospect an iconic moment in my career. To see a full grown rough, tough man on the verge of tears because his Jacaranda mimosifolia had lost its one flower in transport was memorable to say the least. I often wonder who he was and how his garden got on that year, I do hope he did ok. That was my first sighting of a tree that was to become one of my top 10 trees. The atmosphere on the build was amazing and honestly it made me realise that when I changed careers, scary as that was, I had made the best decision of my life!

Since then I have visited Hampton Court many times, both on build and as a visitor, I’ve always preferred it to Chelsea if I’m honest. It feels less crowded, less frantic. The standard of displays has always been just as good, if not better in some cases. In the past 2 years the butterfly dome has been an enormous draw for visitors, seeing a little girl looking at wonder at a huge butterfly that had decided to alight on her hand was just delightful. Hopefully a memory that might turn her into a future entomologist!

Theres lots of shopping opportunities at Hampton Court too, not just for sundries, gadgets and fancy things but for plants! The floral marquee is as always a dangerous place for those of us with plant avarice. Last year I picked up some gorgeous bits and pieces. Pelargonium ‘Springfield black’ and ‘Lord Bute’ came home and are now gracing the pots in various places at Ulting Wick, performing beautifully. A Colocasia ‘Hawaiian blue’ survived this harsh winter and has grown well enough to be split and is in pots by the front door. As usual I will be keeping my eyes open for the unusual or beautiful, I feel myself increasingly being drawn towards the amazing leaves of Begonias.

Outside there are beautiful gardens to admire and take inspiration from, one designer I’ve come to admire recently has been Charlie Bloom. Her designs are accessible for most urban gardeners. Materials and plant selections that would grace any average back garden and turn it into a paradise. Last year her garden ‘Colour box’ was literally overrun by admiring visitors, crowds standing 5 deep to catch a glimpse of the cheerful simplicity which was obviously something that was easily relatable to. Come sell off time the garden disappeared in minutes!

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Its worth mentioning the ethos behind her work at this point, unlike most show gardens the budget involved was minimal. The entire build was done on a shoestring! Charlie involved several suppliers, friends and volunteers to create her vision. Shes very vocal about this, praising each and every person involved. It really is a team effort, which is a beautiful thing to see. This year is no different in that sense, in fact maybe even more so with various parties such as Nickie Bonn, Stark and Greensmith, Lewis Normand, Art4Space, London Stone and possibly many others I haven’t named, giving time, materials and smiles to create ‘Brilliance in Bloom’. Having followed its creation on Twitter it’s another amazing garden which I’m sure the public will fall in love with.

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One which caught my eye from its design brief mainly due to the fantastical description was the Elements Mystique Garden by Elements Garden Design. It features the work of Belgian sculptor William Roobrouck. Corten steel in gardens seems to be very in vogue at the moment! The sphere which dominates the garden is representing a fallen meteor with a planting scheme representing the heat the plants closest would have suffered, ruptured paving from the impact has a fantasy element that appeals to me.

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There were 3 others which caught my eye

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First the Hampton Court gardens team has produced this amazing Battlefield garden, the sheer logistics in the build are stunning as is the attention to detail. It’s not classically pretty, no, but the feat of shifting tonnes of earth to create huge trenches, phenomenal!

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Even without being told you realise that as you journey through the garden you are travelling through time from a war zone, albeit a staged one, to an area abandoned by man and slowly being reclaimed by wildlife.

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Huge bombcraters, littered with remnants of rusted metal bearing witness to the fierce horror the land witnessed. The wildflowers which colonise the landscape as you travel through the installation are brought to life with dragonflies,butterflies and other wildlife that have colonised the site since the build started. the blasted, dead trees standing sentinel overall.

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The second literally stopped me in my tracks!

One of the most gorgeous Loquat trees I’ve seen in a long time, surrounded by gorgeous exotic foliage. Excellent use of hard landscaping and on a scale that didn’t dominate. As you travel along the garden you are suddenly treated to a blaze of colour carpeting the ground! Bizzie Lizzies!

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Ok, I admit when I read the brief on this garden I turned my snobby nose up… Its true, I admit it…. I take it all back!

Firstly my snobby brain went “B&Q! Making a show garden! Pfft!”…. I am shame

Second “Bizzie Lizzies! Oh god, how 1970’s!” … I am doubley shame

The guys who created this garden have got a well deserved gold medal, hats off, it’s not a horrible dated monstrosity even in the slightest, its gorgeous. Using Buzy Lizzies in such a way as to reflect their natural environment, understory planting in a garden that gives the feel of somewhere way more exotic than south, west London!

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And my final surprise is based on the quality of the plants used and the execution of the build. This one was a creeper in the sense it took me a while to realise exactly how good it was. I spent longer looking at this installation than at quite a few other more spectacular builds. Great Gardens of the USA is a garden of 2 halves

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The use of plants was exquisite, from the wild rugged Oregon gardens to the chic courtyard of Charlestown & South Carolina

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Once you’ve had your fill of the gardens and shopping take a moment to check out some of the workshops and talks being held throughout the week

Firstly, perhaps not one for the vegans (kidding before anyone gets annoyed), plants that eat meat!

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Take the time to have a look at Matthew Soper’s display, from Hampshire Carnivorous Plants. He’s been nominated as this years Master Grower. He is a wealth of information on this fascinating genre of plants that have evolved ingenious methods of supplementing their diet using insects and mammals as food sources. I love murderous plants!

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There are also various fun workshops and experiences to enjoy throughout the week. For those of you that missed the Chatsworth Orchid display there’s a second chance to see an insects eye view of pollinating an orchid! This virtual reality experience is great for adults and kids alike.

If you have kids with you there’s lots of stuff aimed at them like making fairy flower crowns and bumble bees! Also make your own bird feeders and mini gardens that you can take home with you… to be honest, that actually sounds quite fun, I get odd looks when I do these things without borrowing a friends child first, being an adult is so hard sometimes! *stamps foot*

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Anyway, you can dig for fossils, forage wild food, learn how to do a modern floral arrangement then learn calligraphy! With your new found skills you could host the most awesome dinner party to show off your fossil finds. Your menu could be made up from stuff you find in hedgerows with a lovely floral centrepiece and delicately inscribed namecards and invitations… am I right or am I right!

More details of where to find all these things will be available in your programme guide.

In fact there is a ridiculous amount to do, you’re going to be hard pushed to see and experience everything, think of this like an upmarket festival so careful planning may be needed to get the most out of your day. Think of it like Glastonbury for flowers where the “must see bands” are Piet Oudolf, Raymond Blanc, Greg Wallace, The floral marquee and the Kinetic trees!…. In fact that is an awesome band name… someone should use that!

Anyway, pack your sunnys, a hat, a bottle of water and your credit card cos Hampton is on! Enjoy!

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RHS Chatsworth, a grand day out!

RHS Chatsworth, a grand day out!
My new favourite Flower show
I had a fabulous day at Chatsworth here’s why you would too…

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This was my first visit to Chatsworth, both as a venue and for an RHS show there. Given I visit a lot of gardens I have been extremely remiss in not seeing this iconic Capability Brown landscape before now.

This is Chatsworth’s second year hosting one of the RHS monumental shows and it is an incredible feat of organisation and logistics, as are all of their shows! The planning for these events takes real skill and for the designers and nurseries attending it can be the pinnacle of months of planning.

So, what did I have on my ‘must see’ list?

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Naturally Orchids, there is  a huge instalment of over 5ooo, grown by Double H Nurseries in Hampshire.

Chatsworth was once home to one of the most extensive and rare Orchid collections in the world. John Gibson was instrumental in collecting many new varieties from the wild for the Duke of Devonshire and his Head Gardener Sir Joseph Paxton. So this display is something of a homecoming for Orchid lovers.

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Their display of Phalenopsis and other exotic Orchids  has been designed by Jonathan Moseley. There will also be talks and advice clinics to look forward to throughout the week for those of you who love these exotic beauties. For those of you wanting an insects eye view theres also a chance to try out a virtual reality experience of how insects see things!

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What I hadn’t realised, and this is incredibly exciting, is this would introduce me to a brand new series of scented Phalenopsis that have been 25 years in the breeding! I feel very honoured to now be the proud owner of 2 of their 3 new scented varieties. There are 3 which will soon be launched into supermarkets near you and they really are mouth wateringly gorgeous. Look out for ‘Diffusion’ with purple/pink petals, this beauty is a holder of the RHS AGM. Along with ‘New life’, another RHS AGM holder, whose petals are a delicate pink with a yellow lip. Finally ‘Sunny smell’ who’s blooms have a tropical, cheerful feel in yellow with shades of pink.

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Next up on my ‘must see’ list

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Paul Hervey-Brookes  has designed the Brewin Dolphin Garden, which I’ve been following with interest on Twitter for the last few weeks. For the last couple of years I’ve followed Paul’s journey, you’d have a harder heart than mine not to be touched by the sorrows hes been through yet his courage throughout it all has been inspiring.

His credentials both as a horticulturalist/botanist and a designer are utterly stunning! His work seems to consistently reinvent itself. He takes each new challenge and seems to look at it in an entirely different manner from the last, totally ignoring the idea that a garden designer has to develop a ‘style’ which can often box a designer into a corner, their popularity dependent entirely on the whims of fashion. If I seem a bit of a fan girl here its because I am, even if you ignore the fact he’s one of the Pershore club like myself, its his ability to seamlessly slip from cottage garden frothiness to brutalist modernism with incredible ease and always picking exactly the right plants to complement the hard landscaping involved.

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This garden has been inspired by a lost Chatsworth village, a disappeared part of local history that stood in the way of Capability Browns plans. The village now just a ghostly memory that haunts the land reappearing when weather conditions allow the grass to dry out and its streets and houses are laid out once more in the turf, only to vanish again when the rains come.

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The hard landscaping reflects local traditional building materials and methods, whilst the planting uses many plants we will all be familiar with. One comment made, not by myself, was that he manages to stitch them together in such a way that the plants themselves look new and exciting, which I thought was an excellent description!

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Inside the cathedral like space, which seems so hard from the outside there is a feeling of warmth and serenity, its like hiding in plain sight. You get glimpses of the world beyond but are totally hidden within its structure. Its also worth mentioning the finishing detail for an area which few will actually see up close is absolutely stunning even down to the beautiful vases of flowers on the tables.

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The insect life also loved the garden giving me the best view of a Mayfly I’ve ever had!

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I also have a new favourite fern, sadly I don’t know its name but it looks stunning with this Astrantia

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Surprises from around the show

I had a look at the show gardens where I fell in love with this one by Phil Hurst called “The Great Outdoors”. I loved the planting of bright colours giving it a feel of vibrance. The hard landscaping includes dark wood decks which appear to float over deep pools of water. The main path is a beautiful ochre that looks a bit like crushed sandstone. This leads to a wonderful structure, that I hesitate to call a pergola purely because of its jaunty shape, in a restful green oasis. For a small space there is so much movement going on here yet it doesn’t feel overly busy and its something that could easily be transferred to a small urban garden.

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Next up were the long borders where combinations of plants stole the show

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And of course the plant marquees and nurseries around the site, I did succumb to one or two beauties!

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One of the main things that struck me as being distinctly different to Chelsea and Hampton was a feeling of inclusivity, if you used to go to the Malvern shows about 10 years ago this is how they felt. It truly does feel family friendly, its not a set for people to pose for the press, it has educational, fun stuff. Large spaces for your wild things(children) to run free. Lots of gorgeous stalls selling art, fabrics, jewellery… pretty much everything you could ever think of! Yes there are beautiful show gardens and installations, yes there are amazing nurseries but there’s something very different, very special about Chatsworth and I think I’ve found my new favourite show!